Richmond Hill Public Library News Index
James Newton's contract of employment


Description
Media Type:
Text
Item Type:
Documents
Description:
Contract of employment signed by James Newton.
Notes:
The community of Elgin Mills, a mile north of Richmond Hill, was really considered a part of the village, owing to its proximity and the fact that a number of men from here were employed at the Newton Tannery. Bicycles were a popular means of transportation to their work.
Mr. James Newton, who was a carpenter and contractor, arrived at Elgin Mills after coming from Scotland in 1834 where he had learned his trade. He later started the Newton Tanning Co., which was operated by two of his six sons, James Jr. and Andrew Newton. The tannery was on the north side of Elgin Mills sideroad near the west side of Yonge Street, extending north to Chip St. As a side line, the Newtons kept hogs, feeding them on the trimmings of the hides.
Elgin Mills also had a large hoop and stave factory on Chip St. This was operated by Mr. Hamilton, also a small cooper shop making barrels to ship flour in was run by Naughton Brothers. A large flour mill was operated by a Mr. Dixon. His house and stables were situated on the north of Richmond Hill where the stone house now stands, on the west side of Yonge Street. (Information given by Mr. George Sims, son-in-law of J .Newton)
Mr. James Newton Sr. was a close friend of Mr. Thomas Kinnear, an early well to do settler on North Yonge St., and made a habit of often visiting his friend on Sunday mornings. It was on one of these visits in the year 1843, that he and another friend, Captain Francis Boyd, made the gruesome discovery of Mr. Kinnear’s body, also that of his housekeeper, both of whom had been murdered by the housemaid and handyman employed by Mr. Kinnear. This double murder was a topic of conversation in the district for many years afterward.
Many fine houses erected in the 1800’s in Richmond Hill and vicinity, were built by Mr. Newton, who was well known as a good carpenter and trustworthy contractor. His son Andrew Newton lived in the large brick house second south of Wright and Taylor Panerai Home. He was the foster father of J. Earl Newton, a noted musician, who was organist of Richmond Hill Presbyterian Church for several years until he left for the U.S. to become musical supervisor of the Ladie’s College in New Brunswick, New Jersey. His body was returned for burial in Richmond Hill cemetery upon his death.
Inscriptions:
July 8 1835
I do here by to do all the carpenter and joiner work of every description of Mr. Smith's House glazing included in a substantial and workman like manner for the sum of one hundred and fifteen pounds currency according to the plan and specification
James Newton
Date of Original:
8 Jul 1835
Dimensions:
Width: 18 cm
Height: 8 cm
Subject(s):
Collection:
Richmond Hill Public Library. Tweedsmuir History Collection
Language of Item:
English
Geographic Coverage:
  • Ontario, Canada
    Latitude: 43.87111 Longitude: -79.43725
Creative Commons licence:
by-nc-nd [more details]
Contact
Richmond Hill Public Library
WWW address
Agency street/mail address

1 Atkinson St, Richmond Hill, ON L4C 0H5

Full Text

July 8 1835

I do here by to do all the carpenter and joiner work of every description of Mr. Smith's House glazing included in a substantial and workman like manner for the sum of one hundred and fifteen pounds currency according to the plan and specification

James Newton

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James Newton's contract of employment


Contract of employment signed by James Newton.